U.S.-China relations Part 3: New balance in economic power

Arika Ho
Pronouns
(She/Her)
Business Manager
Oct 19, 2020
After discussing the history and the present of friend-foe relationship between the U.S. and China in the last issue, what is next? The future. This is about whether the U.S. will stay in power and China will rise to the international number one despite all deterrence. Building my argument upon the article “U.S.-China Relation Part 2” published in the last issue, this piece will focus on my prediction of domestic and international economy of the two countries and refer them to the response from the international community.
Appears in
2020 - Fall - Issue 6
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U.S.-China relation part 2: from harmony to deterrence

Arika Ho
Pronouns
(She/Her)
Business Manager
Oct 05, 2020
Following the first piece of U.S.-China relations about the two presidents holding similar but structurally different beliefs in authoritarianism published in last week’s issue, this second piece will cover the emergence of China in the international arena and how the U.S. has responded to China’s rise. But, first of all, I would like to share my “no surprise” towards President Donald Trump who tested positive with COVID-19, because of his levity on the recommendations on wearing masks and COVID-19 health protocols. I wish him to recover soon, but he should rethink if he is competent enough to be re-elected. To kick start the discussion of international standing very superficially, President Xi Jingping won over Trump in this COVID-19 war, as at least Xi did not catch COVID-19.
Appears in
2020 - Fall - Issue 5
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The Xinjiang conflict and Uyghur genocide

Quinn Castaneda
Pronouns
(She/Her)
Assistant Editor
Sep 28, 2020
In addition to the COVID-19 pandemic, 2020 has forced the world to acknowledge a number of other harsh realities, including racial discrimination and injustice, climate change, and various humanitarian crises in a variety countries, including the U.S. In the Xinjiang region of China, hundreds of thousands of Uyghur children are being separated from their families, not unlike the way Hispanic and Latinx children are being separated from their parents at the U.S. border. World governments are becoming more widely aware of China’s detainment of Uyghur people in Xinjiang. What doesn’t seem to be as widely known to the general public is how long these internment camps have actually been around and how long the general tension between China and Xinjiang has gone on.
Appears in
2020 - Fall - Issue 4
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